Millennials are coming of age, not just as adults but also as the leaders of our workforce. In fact, millennials are currently the largest percentage of the U.S. employee pool, and that number is only expected to grow in the next decade. Yet the legal industry, which values experience and tradition, skews older. According to a 2014 article in the ABA Journal, “in 1980, 36 percent of the nation’s licensed lawyers were under age 35, compared to just 13 percent in this age group in 2005 … Meanwhile, the median lawyer age also increased from 39 in 1980 to 49 in 2005.”

This should be ominous news for lawyers. If law firm leaders want their legacies to survive them, they will have to fill their ranks with younger attorneys. Furthermore, the lack of youthful talent in the profession means that a growing cultural disconnect between law firm clients and their outside counsel could make relationships more challenging to manage. 

How do law firms attract, integrate and motivate younger lawyers, especially when the mindsets of baby-boomer attorneys often clash with the expectations of millennials? For further insights on the topic, check out Senior Vice President, Marketing and Business Development, Sue Remley’s recently published article on retaining millennial talent.

How can Jaffe help your law firm with generational issues?

Jaffe can work with your law firm leadership to create and execute strategic plans that address generational issues among your lawyers. Our marketing and business development consultants, who have decades of experience in the legal industry, can assist with developing incentive programs, recruitment strategies and succession plans that address the needs of attorneys across the generational spectrum. In addition, our creative and content teams can help you design effective communications to better attract and retain millennial attorneys.

Are you ready to bridge the generational divide? For more information about our cross-generational consulting services, contact Terry M. Isner at tisner@jaffepr.com.